Finding Your Work A Home: Helpful Literary Websites

It’s Spring Break! That means I have more time to focus on my creative writing and put together a list of literary magazines I might want to send my work to.

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In addition to working on creative stuff, I will also be taking a road trip during my vacation.

Back in my earlier blogging days (like last year), I wrote a post talking about different websites writers can use when they are ready to start submitting their work. That particular post has long since vanished, however, I have recreated it here and included some new information.

Since there are hundreds of literary magazines out in the world, the process of finding a good home for your work can be tedious. Luckily, there are several websites that can make the search a lot easier.

It is important to note, while the websites listed below are extremely helpful, they should not be used in lieu of doing your own research.

What do I mean when I say “research?” As the writer, you are responsible for checking out a literary magazine’s website on your own. Websites can house a lot of information that might not be present in a database listing. This can include accurate submission deadlines and format specifications.

Another important thing you can learn from scouting out a magazine’s website is the type of work the editor/s tend to publish. If you notice that a magazine only publishes literary fiction, then don’t send them your mystery story. If a magazine states that they only publish flash fiction then, please, don’t send them a twenty page document.

List of Websites

Duotrope. A paid subscription. $5 a month grants you access to lots of advanced search functions. For example, there’s a search option that allows you to search only for lit mags that publish “feminist” fiction, or “creative non-fiction.” There’s also a function that allows you to search for lit mags that are print-only, or online-only. Duotrope tends to be a lot more accurate than some free options. A lot of the time, on other sites like “The Review Review,” a posting will say that a lit mag is accepting submissions, however, when you go to the website, you learn that submissions are actually closed for the year.

New Pages. This is one of my favorite free resources to use when searching for lit mags to submit to. There is a “Classified” section on the website that provides an extensive list of magazines that are currently accepting submissions. Although it can be time-consuming to find a magazine that is accepting the type of work you are submitting, it is definitely worth the time and effort, especially if you check back on a daily basis

Poets and Writers Database of Literary Magazines. A very large database which is also free to use. It lists hundreds of literary magazines for your browsing pleasure. This website is particularly useful if you want to get a feel for the types of magazines on the market. The search function is not as advanced as other sites.

Entropy Magazine’s “Where to Submit.” Entropy is a literary magazine that also publishes a bi-monthly “Where To Submit” blog post. The post provides an extensive list of presses, calls for chapbooks, journals, anthologies, as well as residencies, fellowships, conferences, and other writing opportunities. The best part of this list is its accuracy. For the most part, every listing is accepting submissions during the time period specified by the blog post. Additionally, the post specifies any reading fees involved with submitting to any given press, magazine, and/or contest.

What about you guys? Do have a specific website you like to use when searching for literary magazines? Let me know in the comments.

Happy Spring!

— Manuela Williams

 

Evolution of a Chapbook

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Image Credit: Birds Piled Loosely Press

Since I first started seriously writing poetry (and by seriously, I mean that I stopped rhyming “rain” with “pain” every other line), I wanted to publish a chapbook.

For those of you who are unfamiliar with the term, a chapbook is a shorter version of a full length book (for example, my chapbook is only 32 pages, compared to 100+ pages). Chapbooks can be cheaper than full length books and, according to the Writer’s Digest article I linked to above, inexpensive for publishers to produce (as most are sewn or stapled together rather than hard bound).

Before I began the submission process, I had hundreds of poems stashed away on my computer. Why didn’t I just throw all those together into a manuscript, send it to a press, and call it a day? Simply put, when putting together a chapbook manuscript, story still matters. How are the poems working together as a whole? Do they form some kind of story? Speak to a specific theme? All of these questions matter when putting together a good manuscript.

When I was confident that I had a strong manuscript, I turned to one of my favorite resources: Entropy Magazine’s “Where to Submit” bimonthly blog post. I absolutely love this website and it has helped me find small presses and journals for my poetry.

It was through Entropy Magazine that I found the 2017 Hard to Swallow Chapbook Contest from Birds Piled Loosely Press (BPL). And the rest, as they say, was history. My chapbook manuscript, Ghost in Girl Costume, was one of three winners and is now available for purchase.

I found working with BPL to be very rewarding. The editors were responsive and wanted me to be 100% happy with the final product. They worked closely with me on cover and interior design and were patient with all my “newbie” questions (hey, this is my first chapbook, cut me some slack).

One of the most rewarding aspects of the process was the “final workshop” of my manuscript. Through Google Hangouts, I met with BPL’s editors, who went through my manuscript page-by-page and suggested ways in which the manuscript could be further improved. That being said, they never forced me into any changes (creative freedom, woohoo!).

Finally, as I am a firm believer in giving back, I decided to donate any royalties I make through this chapbook to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, a cause that I am extremely passionate about.

This certainly isn’t the end for me, though, and I hope to have some new material out in the world soon. Keep an eye out!

— Manuela Williams